Thursday, July 21, 2016

Parental responsibility and the internet

My eight year-old daughter loves the internet.

While I see how much it is helping her learn so many things, and increasing her reading ability enormously, I know there are dangers.

I have to watch and make sure she doesn't give out personal information, or her location. And have explained why it isn't something I want her to do.

I ask her to let me know if anyone gets "too interested" in her- although her interaction seems to be limited (so far) to posting comments on Youtube videos.

I pay attention to what she finds and wants to show me- and sometimes it is something I have to warn her about, or explain. I'm always there, and I don't judge her for what she finds interesting or scary. That's parenting.

The benefits of her being online outweigh- to me- the dangers. But I know it is my responsibility to watch out and protect her.

I see some parents who seem to resent that necessity, and fall back on "parental blocking" and such, but it's a job I willingly take on. If it weren't the internet, it would be something else. It's always something.

I don't want "laws" or anything else advocated, passed, or enforced to supposedly "protect" her.

Out there in the real world, there are no "parental blocks". And, kids will always find a way around them anyway. Might as well step up and start helping the kids learn to navigate the world now.

If you get any value from my labors, consider rewarding me with your financial support. This blog is in its 10th year now. If you believe I have contributed anything to the conversation regarding liberty during these ten years, and believe I have more to contribute, help me stay online.



  1. "Might as well step up and start helping the kids learn to navigate the world now."

    That's parenting.

    Ultimately, your job as a parent is to teach your children to be mature responsible happy healthy parents.

  2. My niece and nephew both had their own computers while growing up, but they were in the living room where anyone could see what they were doing.